Faculty and Staff


Elliott Antokoletz
Charles Carson
Andrew Dell’Antonio
Veit Erlmann
Robert Freeman
David Hunter
Hannah Lewis
Robin Moore
Luisa Nardini
Guido Olivieri
Sonia Seeman
Stephen Slawek
Michael Tusa


Eric Antokoletz

Elliott Antokoletz

Professor of Musicology
MRH 3.714 512-471-0698
antokoletz@mail.utexas.edu

Elliott Antokoletz, Professor of Musicology at the University of Texas at Austin, has held the Alice Mackie Scott Tacquard Endowed Centennial Chair and E.W. Doty Professorship in Fine Arts. He is the author of The Music of Béla Bartók: A Study of Tonality and Progression in Twentieth-Century Music (University of California Press, 1984), Béla Bartók, A Guide To Research (Garland, 1988; 2nd ed. rev. 1997), Twentieth Century Music (Prentice Hall, 1992), Musical Symbolism in the Operas of Debussy and Bartók: Trauma, Gender, and the Unfolding of the Unconscious (Oxford, 2004), and co-author of Manuel de Falla’s Cuatro Piezas Españolas: Combinations and Transformations of the Spanish Folk Modes (VDM Verlag, 2009). He is contributing editor of Bartók Perspectives: Man, Composer, and Ethnomusicologist (Oxford, 2000) and Rethinking Debussy (Oxford, in press). He is also co-editor of the International Journal of Musicology (Frankfurt: Peter Lang, since 1992) and editor of Georg von Albrecht: From Musical Folklore to Twelve-Tone Technique: Memoirs of a Musician Between East and West (Scarecrow Press, 2004). Several book translations include Chinese, Polish, Spanish, and Italian. He has contributed entries to the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, articles to most of the major music journals, and chapters to various book compilations such asSibelius Studies (Cambridge, 2001), Encomium Musicae: Essays in Honor of Robert J. Snow (Pendragon, 2002) on20th-century composers from Spain, The Bartók Companion (Faber, 1993), Copland and His Times (Princeton, 2005), and Ravel Studies (Rochester, forthcoming).
In 1982 he served as scholarly evaluator for the Harry Ransom Center (HRC) at the University of Texas for acquisition of the Stravinsky Archive as well as archival collections of Ravel, Dukas, Roussel, Fauré, and Debussy. The “Elliott Antokoletz Bartókiana Collection” is housed, together with the “Benjamin Suchoff Bartókiana Collection” (Former Trustee of the Béla Bartók Estate and Head of the New York Bartók Archive), at the University of South Florida at Tampa. Antokoletz has lectured in Hungary, Germany, England, Spain, Switzerland, Poland, Mexico, Brazil, Australia, and throughout the United States. He received the Béla Bartók Memorial Plaque and Diploma from the Hungarian Government in 1981, two subventions from the National Endowment for the Humanities (1980 and 1982), Teaching Excellence Award from the University of Texas (1981), and PhD Alumni Award from the City University of New York (1987). He was Director of the Bartók International Congress 2000 and Debussy International Congress 2006 at the University of Texas. Antokoletz majored in violin performance under Dorothy Delay and Ivan Galamian at the Juilliard School of Music (1960-1964), and received his PhD in Historical Musicology from the City University of New York (1975). From 1973 to 1976, he taught theory and chamber music at Queens College, where he was a member of the Faculty String Quartet, and was also concertmaster of the New Repertory Ensemble of New York.

charles carson

Charles Carson

Assistant Professor of Musicology
ccarson@utexas.edu

Charles Carson is a musicologist whose interests are African-American/American expressive cultures, Popular Music, Jazz, Film Music, and music and culture. A graduate of the Moores School of Music at the University of Houston, Charles is a former Howard Mayer Brown Fellow for the American Musicological Society. He received his PhD in Music History from the University of Pennsylvania, with a dissertation entitled “Broad and Market: At the Crossroads of Race and Class in Philadelphia Jazz, 1956-1980.” He has presented and published in a number of venues, on topics ranging from theme park music to smooth jazz.

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dellantonio

Andrew Dell’Antonio

University Distinguished Teaching Professor of Musicology
dellantonio@austin.utexas.edu

Andrew Dell’Antonio (PhD, University of California at Berkeley, 1991), University Distinguished Teaching Professor and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies in the College of Fine Arts, specializes in musical repertories of early modern Europe, with a focus on seventeenth-century Italy. His research and teaching interests include musical historiography, feminist/queer theory (he is associate of theCenter for Women’s Studies at UT,) and disability studies. He blogs at The Avid Listener, and is co-author of the textbook The Enjoyment of Music

Professor Dell’Antonio’s doctoral dissertation on the early sonata was awarded an international prize for musicological scholarship, and a revised version was published by the Libreria Musicale Italiana . He has contributed to the revised New Grove , Grove Dictionary of American Music, Die Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart musical encyclopedias, and has published articles and reviews in American Music Cambridge Opera Journal, Notes, repercussions, and Il saggiatore musicale , as well as several collections of essays, most notably in Gender, Sexuality, and Early Music , ed. Todd Borgerding, and Culture and Authority in Baroque Europe ed. Massimo Ciavolella. His most recent monograph, Listening as Spiritual Practice in Early Modern Italy (University of California Press, 2011), addresses musical styles and aesthetics in the early Italian baroque, with particular focus on the spiritual and gender implications of changing listening practices. Earlier publications included investigations of contemporary popular music and the fashioning of a postmodern critical stance, resulting in his editing and contributing to the collection of essays Beyond Structural Listening? Postmodern Modes of Hearing (University of California Press, 2004).

Professor Dell’Antonio was the 2010-2011 William David Blunk Professor at the University of Texas. He was a recipient of the inaugural University of Texas Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Award (2009), and was also selected for the 2010 Award for Distinction in Teaching by Phi Beta Kappa for the Alpha of Texas Chapter and the 2007 College of Fine Arts Distinguished Teaching Award He was one of a small group of faculty members at the University of Texas selected as fellows for the inaugural year of The University of Texas Humanities Institute . During the academic year 2001-02, he was Mellon Fellow at the Harvard-Villa I Tatti Center for Renaissance Studies in Florence, Italy. See also Professor Dell’Antonio’s curriculum vitae.

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erlmann

Veit Erlmann

Professor of Ethnomusicology
erlmann@mail.utexas.edu

Veit Erlmann holds the Endowed Chair of Music History. He studied musicology, sociology, anthropology and philosophy in Berlin and Cologne, where he obtained a Dr.phil. in 1978 and did a Habilitation in musicology in 1989 and in anthropology in 1994. He has done fieldwork in Ecuador and in several African countries such as Cameroon, Niger, Ghana, South Africa and Lesotho. Currently he is doing research in West Sumatra, Indonesia. Dr. Erlmann has been on the faculties of the University of Natal, the University of Chicago, the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, and the Free University of Berlin. Among his publications are African Stars, Studies in Black South African Performance and Nightsong, and Performance, Power and Practice in South Africa, both published by the University of Chicago Press. His most recent book,Music, Modernity and the Global Imagination, published by Oxford University Press won the Alan P.Merriam Prize for the best English-language monograph in ethnomusicology.For more information see Professor Erlmann’s Web Page.

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freeman

Robert Freeman

Professor of Musicology
rsfreeman@mail.utexas.edu

Robert Freeman took his undergraduate degree in music at Harvard in 1957, with highest honors, concurrently completing a diploma in piano at the Longy School and studying during the summers of 1955 and 1956 with Artur Balsam and Rudolf Serkin. After a year in Europe on one of Harvard’s Sheldon Traveling Fellowships, he took MFA and PhD degrees in musicology at Princeton, where he joined the faculty in 1963, conducting the University Orchestra during the period 1965-68 as an assistant professor. He served as assistant and associate professor at MIT during the period 1968-73, and in the fall of 1972 was appointed director of the Eastman School of Music, which he led from 1972 to 1996. Appointed president of the New England Conservatory in 1996, he moved to the University of Texas at Austin in 2000 as dean of the College of Fine Arts, a position from which he stepped down in the fall of 2006. A Steinway artist since the mid 1970s, Freeman has performed as pianist in the United States, Canada, and Europe, and has recorded with colleagues both at Eastman and at UT. His honors include two years as a Fulbright fellow to Vienna, 1960-62, a Martha Baird Rockefeller grant in 1962-63, the Civic Medal of Rochester, New York, awarded in connection with his work on downtown revitalization, and an honorary DMA from Hamilton College. He has published on a variety of topics in 18th-century music history and on the history and future of the education of musicians. He has served on advisory councils for music and the arts at Harvard, MIT, Yale, Princeton, Howard, Middlebury, and Vanderbilt, and is a member of the boards of the Austin Symphony, the Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation, and the National Center for Human Performance at the Texas Medical Center in Houston. He chairs the board of the Institute for Music and Brain Science at Harvard-Massachusetts General Hospital. At the University of Texas he holds the Susan Menefee Ragan Regents Professorship in Fine Arts.

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David Hunter

Senior Lecturer
david.hunter@austin.utexas.edu

David Hunter (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1989) is Music Librarian and Curator of the Historical Music Recordings Collection. While Dr. Hunter’s duties at the Fine Arts Library currently preclude a regular teaching assignment he has in the past taught the Reference and Research Materials class and a freshman seminar on George Frideric Handel. He continues to serve on Ph.D. and D.M.A committees. Dr. Hunter has published articles in numerous musicology and historical journals since 1985. His book, Opera and song books published in England, 1703-1726: a descriptive bibliography was published by the Bibliographical Society (London) in 1997. He has also contributed to the major music encyclopedic dictionaries Grove Music Online and Die Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart. He edited the volume Music Publishing and Collecting: Essays in Honor of Donald W. Krummel issued in 1994. He has been the Book Review Editor of Notes and has served on the Editorial Board of Libraries & the Cultural Record (published by the University of Texas Press). Since 1996 Dr. Hunter has been assessing the validity of Handel biographies, testing numerous claims and assumptions. The results of the research have been published in Early Music, Music & Letters, Göttinger Händel-Beiträge, the Newsletters of Handel Institute and the American Handel Society, Eighteenth-Century Ireland, Theatre Notebook, Musical Times, and two festschriften Encomium Musicae: A Festschrift in Honor of Robert J. Snow, and For the Love of Music: Festschrift in Honor of Theodore Front on His 90th Birthday. The historical audience is possibly the last frontier of research in musicology. The facile assumptions and comments to be found in the literature can be superseded and a new history of music written “as if audiences mattered.” To demonstrate the possibilities Dr. Hunter is exploring the entertainment choices of persons who could have attended Handel’s performances during his years in England and Ireland (1711-1759). This long-term research project involves examining archives held at more than 100 sites in the U.K., Ireland, and the U.S.A. Dr. Hunter is spear-heading a collaborative effort to produce a history of the Butler School of Music in time for the centennial of the School during the 2013-14 academic year.

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Hannah Lewis

Assistant Professor of Musicology
hlewis@austin.utexas.edu

Hannah Lewis specializes in film music, music and visual media, twentieth-century avant-garde and experimental music, and musical theater. She received her PhD in Historical Musicology from Harvard University in 2014, and she taught at Tufts University before joining the faculty at UT. In her dissertation, entitled “Negotiating the Soundtrack: Music in Early Sound Film in the U.S. and France, 1926-1934,” she examined the ways directors, producers, and composers responded to technological change during the first years of synchronized sound film. She has presented at national and regional meetings of the American Musicological Society and the Society for American Music (where she received the Mark Tucker Award in 2014), and has essays forthcoming in the Journal of the Society for American Music and American National Biography.

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Moore Robin 2008(Photo by Marsha Miller)

Robin Moore

Professor of Ethnomusicology
robin.moore@utexas.edu

Robin Moore (PhD, The University of Texas at Austin, 1995), Professor of Ethnomusicology, has received awards including fellowships from the Rockfeller Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, and the National Humanities Center. His primary research interests include music and nationalism, music and race relations, popular music study, and socialist art aesthetics. His publications include Nationalizing Blackness: afrocubanismo and artistic revolution in Havana, 1920-1940 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1998), Music and Revolution Cultural Change in Socialist Cuba (The University of California Press, 2006), Music in the Hispanic Caribbean (Oxford University Press, 2010), Musics of Latin America (W.W. Norton, 2012), Danzón: Circum-Caribbean Dialogues in Music and Dance (Oxford University Press, co-authored with Alejandro Madrid, 2013), and articles on Cuban music in the Latin American Music Review, Cuban Studies, Ethnomusicology, Encuentro de la cultura cubana, and other journals and book anthologies. Since 2005, he has served as editor of the Latin American Music Review.

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nardini

Luisa Nardini

Associate Professor of Musicology
nardini@utexas.edu

Ph.D. in Musicology, Università degli Studi “La Sapienza”, Rome, Italy; LMS-Postdoctoral License in Mediaeval Studies, Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, Toronto, Canada; Diploma in Piano Performance, Conservatorio Statale, Benevento, Italy
Luisa Nardini is a medievalist with special interests in the later development of chant repertories in Western Europe. Her works on Gregorian chant, medieval music theory, music and visual art, manuscript studies, and oral and written transmission of liturgical chant had been presented at scholarly forums in North America and Europe. She has published essays and reviews in Acta Musicologica, Mediaeval Studies, Speculum, Plainsong and Medieval Music, Rivista Italiana di Musicologia, Nuova Rivista Musicale Italiana, Cantus Planus, and in miscellaneous volumes. Her forthcoming book, Neo-Gregorian Chant in Beneventan Manuscripts: The Proper of the Mass, will be published with the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies—The University of Toronto Press. It focuses on an extended repertory of liturgical music that circulated in southern Italy after the diffusion of Gregorian chant (8th-9th cent.). This repertory reflects the multi-cultural context of southern Italy in the Middle Ages and sheds new light on some of the most controversial problems related to the earliest history of western music and the interrelationships between Roman, Gallican, Byzantine, and Beneventan chants. She is presently working on a second book on the prosulas copied in Beneventan manuscripts for the Proper of the Mass.
Before coming to UT, Luisa Nardini served on the faculty of the University of California Santa Barbara as a lecturer in musicology. The first musicologist to be awarded an A.W. Mellon postdoctoral fellowship at the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies in Toronto, she has been an Associate Research Scholar at the Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America at Columbia University and the recipient of research grants from the Universities of Naples, Rome, Italy, the University of California Santa Barbara, and The University of Texas, Austin. She serves as an honorary faculty member of the doctorate in musicology at the University of Rome “Tor Vergata” and is regularly invited as a lecturer at the school of specialization on the Ars Nova in Certaldo, Italy. In 2012 she was awarded the “Gladiatore d’Oro,” the highest honorific prize of the Province of Benevento (Italy) for “having contributed with her sophisticated, extraordinary, and passionate studies to the development of the scholarship in the field of medieval music and chant” and holds a Grace Hill Milam Centennial Fellowship in Fine Arts for 2012-2013.
Selected publications:
Books:
Neo-Gregorian Chant in Beneventan Lands: The Proper of the Mass (Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of Toronto, forthcoming).Prosulas for the Proper of the Mass in Beneventan Manuscripts: Edition and Study (in preparation)
Articles in journals:
“The St Peter Connection and the Acquisition of a Roman Offertory in Bologna and Benevento,” Mediaeval Studies 72 (2010): 39-74.“Old-Roman Intruders in non-Roman Manuscripts,” Acta Musicologica 82 (2010): 1-20.“Aliens in Disguise: Byzantine and Gallican Chants in the Latin Liturgy,” Plainsong and Medieval Music 16 (2007): 145-172.“Il repertorio neo-gregoriano nei manoscritti di area beneventana,” Il Saggiatore Musicale 6 (1999): 377-378.“Notizie sugli strumenti da tasto all’inizio del ’700 a Napoli,” Quaderni dell’Archivio Storico del Banco di Napoli 2 (1998): 69-77, co-authored with Guido Olivieri. “Una prosula per san Nicola in un codice della Biblioteca Capitolare di Benevento,” Nicolaus. Studi storici 8 (1997): 481-488. “Il canto gregoriano: una tradizione millenaria,” Worldmusic 25.7 (1997): 17-20. “Transmissions of Repertories/Contamination of Styles: The Case of Liturgical Music in Souther Italy (9th – 13th cent.),” featured on the Website of the Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America at Columbia Universitywww.italianacademy.columbia.edu/publications/working_papers/2004_2005/paper_fa04_Nardini.pdf Book chapters: “The Circulation of Gregorian Chant and the Cult of St Michael in Medieval Southern Italy,” in The Oxford Handbook of Music and World Christianities, eds. Suzel Reily and Jonathan Dueck (Oxford: Oxford University Press, forthcoming). “Riconsiderando i manoscritti musicali della Biblioteca Nazionale di Napoli. Il caso dell’Innario VI G 29,” in Proceedings of the Conference of the International Association of Music Libraries (IAML), Naples, Italy, July 2008, Lucca, (LIM, Libreria Musicale Italiana, forthcoming). “Idee per un progetto di edizione delle prosule del Proprium Missae,” submitted for the Proceedings of the Conference for the centennial anniversary of the Pontificio Istituto di Musica Sacra, Rome, May-June 2011, ed. Francesco Luisi. “In the Quest of Gallican Remnants in Gregorian Manuscripts,” submitted for the collection Music and Censorship, ed. Patricia Hall (Oxford: Oxford University Press, forthcoming). “The Masses for the Holy Cross in Some Medieval Manuscripts,” in “Qui musicam in se habet”: Essays in Honor of Alejandro Planchart, eds. Stanley Boorman and Anna Zayaruznaya (American Institute of Musicology, likely date of publication 2012), submitted, refereed. “La messa Vir Dei Benedictus nei manoscritti liturgici beneventani e non beneventani,” in Proceedings of the International Symposium “Musica e liturgia a Montecassino nel Medioevo,” University of Cassino, Italy, December 2010, ed. Nicola Tangari (Rome, La Viella, “Scritture e libri del Medioevo”, 2012), 115-131. “The Mass for the Octave of the Epiphany in some Beneventan Manuscripts,” in Classica et Beneventana. Essays Presented to Virginia Brown on the Occasion of her 65th Birthday, eds. F.T. Coulson et A.A. Grotans (Brepols: Turnhout, 2008), 391-405. “Montecassino, Archivio della Badia, ms 318: Observations on the Second Tonary Mass Repertory,” in “…Et facciam dolçi canti.” Studi in onore di Agostino Ziino in occasione del suo 65 compleanno, eds. Bianca Maria Antolini, Teresa Maria Gialdroni, and Annunziato Pugliese (Lucca: LIM, 2004), 47-61. “Liturgy as Historiography: Historical, Narrative, and Evocative Values of Eleventh-Century Masses,” in Early Music: Context and Ideas II: Proceedings of he International Conference in Musicology (Krakow, Poland: Jagellonian University—Institute of Musicology, 2008), 27-38. Available on the Jagellonian University website:www.muzykologia.uj.edu.pl/conference/PDF/12Nardini.pdf. “Non-standard Introits in Beneventan Manuscripts: Compositional Strategies and Transmission in the Sources,” inCantus Planus. Papers Read at the Twelfth Meeting Lillafüred, 23-28 August 2004 (Budapest: Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Musicology, 2007), 345-369.

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olivieri

Guido Olivieri

Senior Lecturer in Musicology
olivieri@austin.utexas.edu

Guido Olivieri’s interests focus on the influence of social, cultural, and political contexts on the circulation of music and musicians in eighteenth-century Europe. His dissertation (PhD University of California, Santa Barbara) examined the developments of string sonata in Naples at the beginning of the eighteenth century, investigating problems of performance practice, aspects of musical patronage and reconstructing the musical and cultural relationships between Naples and other European capitals. A Research Fellow at the University of Liverpool (UK) and at The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America at Columbia University, he has been awarded a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he also taught courses on performance practice and on music of the Baroque and Classical eras. He has presented papers at several international conferences and published articles and reviews on Baroque instrumental music as well as on the music of Gaetano Donizetti and Luciano Berio in collective volumes and scholarly journals (Notes, Analecta Musicologica, Studi Musicali, Pergolesi Studies). He has also contributed to the revised editions of The New Grove Dictionary of MusicDie Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart, and the Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani. After his Diploma in violin (Conservatory of Salerno – Italy, 1994), he has devoted his attention to the study of the Baroque violin repertory and performed with several ensembles in Europe and the U.S.

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seeman

Sonia Seeman

Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology
stseeman@austin.utexas.edu

Dr. Seeman’s interests focus on the music of modern Turkey, the Ottoman Empire, and Southeastern Europe, specializing in Rom (“Gypsy”) communities. She has done field research in Macedonia and Southeastern Europe (1985-87; 1989) and in Turkey (1995-1999; 2003) on Rom, Turkish, and transnational musical practices. She received her Phd from UCLA in 2002. Her dissertation,“‘You’re Roman!’ Music and Identity in Turkish Roman Communities,” investigates the relationship between cultural practices and Rom social identity by exploring the tension between music as lived experience and as socially and politically constructed from the Byzantine and Ottoman periods through the present. She taught at UCSB for 4 years on a post-doctoral faculty fellowship and as a lecturer. Courses taught at UCSB and UCLA include: the music of Turkey, Ottoman communities, Roma communities, and Southeastern Europe, as well as seminars on ethnomusicological theory, world popular music, and the anthropology of music. Her theoretical interests include: transnationalism and cosmopolitanism; minority communities; recording industry; post-structuralism; phenomenological hermeneutics. Seeman has articles in Middle East Studies Association Bulletin, Ethnomusicology Forum, and Music and Anthropology. She has also written several sets of liner notes, and co-produced an ethnographic recording with clarinetist Selim Sesler, “Roads to Kesan”, released by Kalan Muzik. Her recent research interests explore emergent Turkish cultural expressions and ongoing configuration of ethnic and gendered identities in the wake of the European Union accession processes.

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Stephen Slawek

Professor of Ethnomusicology
slawek@austin.utexas.edu

Stephen Slawek (PhD, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1986), Professor, joined the faculty in 1983, adding an Asianist’s perspective to the curricular offerings of the ethnomusicology program. He specializes in the musical traditions of South Asia and has secondary interests in Southeast Asian music and American popular music. His publications draw upon extensive field experience and personal studies of performance practice in India. He has authored one book, Sitar Technique in Nibaddh Forms (Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass 1987) and, with Robert Hardgrave, Jr., co-authored Musical Instruments of North India: Eighteenth Century Portraits by Baltazard Solvyns (Delhi: Manohar Publishers 1997). He has contributed articles and reviews to several journals such as Ethnomusicology, Asian Music, The Yearbook for Traditional Music , Notes and Journal of Vaishnava Studies, and has articles in The Garland Encyclopedia for World Music: South Asia and The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. Professor Slawek has served as a member of the Council of the Society for Ethnomusicology, as Second Vice-President of the Society for Ethnomusicology, as a member of the Board of the Society for Asian Music, and as editor of Asian Music, the Journal of the Society for Asian Music. A senior disciple of Pandit Ravi Shankar, he has an international reputation as an accomplished performer on the Indian sitar. In addition to teaching undergraduate courses on Asian musics and graduate seminars in ethnomusicology, Professor Slawek directs the Indian Classical Music Ensemble

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tusa

Michael Tusa

Professor of Musicology
mctusa@austin.utexas.edu

Michael C. Tusa (PhD Princeton University, 1983), Professor, has been a member of the Musicology faculty since 1981. His interests include nineteenth-century opera, Beethoven, the compositional process, and piano music. His publications include a monograph, “Euryanthe” and Carl Maria von Weber’s Dramaturgy of German Opera(1991) and a volume in the Ashgate Library of Essays in Opera Studies, National Traditions in Nineteenth-Century Opera II: Central and Eastern Europe (2010). His essays have appeared in 19th-Century Music, Archiv für Musikwissenschaft, The Music Review, Journal of the American Musicological Society, Beethoven Forum, Journal of the American Liszt Society, Journal of Musicology, International Journal of Musicology, andJournal of Interdisciplinary History. He wrote the entry on Weber in the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians (revised edition) and has contributed essays to theCambridge Companion to Beethoven, the Cambridge Opera Handbook Ludwig van Beethoven. “Fidelio,” and Nineteenth-Century Piano Music.

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